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2015 (University of California UPLAND / ACALA VARIETY TRIAL) – WEST SIDE

 

2015 (University of California PIMA VARIETY TRIAL)
Fiber Quality (hvi) data summary (USDA Visalia Classing Office)

Questions?
Contact: Bob Hutmacher, (Univ. CA)
Cell: (559) 260-8957
email: rbhutmacher@ucdavis.edu

Cooperative Project by: 1/30/2016 version
University of California Cooperative Extension (UC-ANR) / Univ. CA Davis Plant Sci. Dept./ Univ. CA West Side REC
Funding by: CA Cotton Growers Assoc., CA Cotton Alliance, Cotton Incorporated, UC-ANR / UCCE, UCD Plant Sciences
Cooperators: multiple growers, Steve Wright, Dan Munk, Mark Keeley, Raul Delgado, Tarilee Frigulti, Nick Clark, Bill Weir, Brian Marsh, SJV Quality Cotton Growers Assoc – Shafter, UCCE Tulare, Kings, Fresno, Kern, Merced Co.’s

LOCATION: WEST SIDE Research and Extension Center (Fresno County)
HARVEST DATE: 10/26

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2015 (University of California UPLAND / ACALA VARIETY TRIAL) – West Side

 

2015 (University of California UPLAND / ACALA VARIETY TRIAL)
Seed cotton yields, lint percent, gin turnout percent, lint yields

Questions?
Contact: Bob Hutmacher, (Univ. CA)
Cell: (559) 260-8957
email: rbhutmacher@ucdavis.edu

Cooperative Project by: 1/18/2016 version
University of California Cooperative Extension (UC-ANR) / Univ. CA Davis Plant Sci. Dept./ Univ. CA West Side REC
Funding by: CA Cotton Growers Assoc., CA Cotton Alliance, Cotton Incorporated, UC-ANR / UCCE, UCD Plant Sciences
Cooperators: multiple growers, Steve Wright, Dan Munk, Mark Keeley, Raul Delgado, Tarilee Frigulti, Nick Clark, Bill Weir, Brian Marsh, SJV Quality Cotton Growers Assoc – Shafter, UCCE Tulare, Kings, Fresno, Kern, Merced Co.’s

LOCATION: WEST SIDE Research and Extension Center (Fresno County)
HARVEST DATE: 10/26

Download full copy of Research here

2015 (University of California UPLAND / ACALA VARIETY TRIAL) – Shafter

 

2015 (University of California UPLAND / ACALA VARIETY TRIAL)
Seed cotton yields, lint percent, gin turnout percent, lint yields

Questions?
Contact: Bob Hutmacher, (Univ. CA)
Cell: (559) 260-8957
email: rbhutmacher@ucdavis.edu

Cooperative Project by: 1/18/2016 version
University of California Cooperative Extension (UC-ANR) / Univ. CA Davis Plant Sci. Dept./ Univ. CA West Side REC
Funding by: CA Cotton Growers Assoc., CA Cotton Alliance, Cotton Incorporated, UC-ANR / UCCE, UCD Plant Sciences
Cooperators: multiple growers, Steve Wright, Dan Munk, Mark Keeley, Raul Delgado, Tarilee Frigulti, Nick Clark, Bill Weir, Brian Marsh, SJV Quality Cotton Growers Assoc – Shafter, UCCE Tulare, Kings, Fresno, Kern, Merced Co.’s
LOCATION: SHAFTER (Kern County)
HARVEST DATE: 11/09

 

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2014 Summary Deficit Irrigation and Alternative Pima and Acala Cotton Management

 

OBJECTIVES OF RESEARCH:
2013 was the second year and 2014 is the third year of a field research trial that focuses on deficit drip management practices that could be utilized to tighten up and shorten the fruit production period and evaluation of these practices using both full-season commercial Acala and Pima cultivars and experimental germplasm (USDA-ARS and/or commercial companies)…

 

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ACALA VARIETY TRIALS IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY

 

Acala cotton varieties were grown on about 100,000 acres out of the greatly reduced total acreage of about 275,000 acres in 2008. Part of the reason for continuing changes in acreages is overall reductions in planted cotton acreage in California in recent years, but part is also related to shifts to Pima and non-Acala Upland cotton. There are tradeoffs in shifting to Pima (typically reductions in yields) and in shifts to non-Acala Uplands (typically lower price for lint), and growers need reliable, unbiased information regarding expected lint yields and fiber quality in order to make reasonable, lower-risk decisions. The San Joaquin Valley Cotton Board will remain the avenue for varieties to enter our “Approved Variety” testing program. Within Acala testing, the combined SJV Cotton Board and the UCCE Farm Advisor Approved Acala trials represents a source for broadly-based information on varietal performance. Separate trials involving newly-available CA Upland varieties continue to be conducted by Hutmacher and staff at Shafter and West Side REC sites to complement SJVCB I Approved Acala studies. Variety evaluations for yield and quality performance for…

 

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UCCE Approved Acala and Pima Variety Trials

 

The objectives of these studies with Acala and Pima varieties are to evaluate approved Acala varieties and Pima varieties submitted for testing under different environmental conditions and management across the San Joaquin Valley region of California. In order to provide a reasonable limit on the number of varieties in the tests, the entries include newly-approved varieties (approved by the San Joaquin Valley Cotton Board) for the current year, varieties released last year that are in their second year of testing, plus the top 4 or 5 previously-approved varieties (in terms of planted acreage). The new varieties are the focus of tests, but only remain in tests for a minimum of two years following release unless that variety moves into the top 4 or 5 varieties in planted acreage. Released varieties also may not show up in tests if companies request that the variety is for a special market and don’t want it in multiple location testing, or when seed supplies are inadequate. The Pima tests focus on approved varieties, but in the past two years have also included a non-approved hybrid that has been of interest due to yield…

 

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Assessment of Fusarium in the San Joaquin Valley: Field Evaluations and Variety Screening

 

Fusarium w.ilt of cotton in California has been considered a potentially serious fungal disease caused by the organism Fusarium oxysporum vas infectum (also called ”FOV”) for many decades in several areas of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). In the past, however, damage associated with FOV in SJV cotton has been notable only in areas with the combination of: (a) moderate to high populations of one or more specific races of FOV (usually race 1 ); (b) soils with a sandy or sandy loam texture; and (c) where root lrnot nematodes were present in high-enough populations to cause some significant root damage. Past research generally indicated that FOV damage was worst when both FOV inoculum and nematodes were present in relatively high…

 

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Population development, selection, and evaluation for heat stress.

 

Summary:
Cotton is routinely grown in the hot, irrigated areas of the far Western U.S., and these extended periods of high temperature can reduce cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L. and G. barbadense) lint yield, even with adequate irrigation conditions. Extended periods of extremely high temperatures are common in these areas during the critical stage of peak flowering. When temperatures in the San Joaquin Valley reach temperatures above normal during the critical stage of peak flowering, California growers suffer the consequences of reduced yield by these cotton varieties weaknesses to heat. The number of cotton commercial varieties for California with heat tolerance is not really known. However, it is known that Acala varieties Maxxa and Phytogen 72 yield poorly in the heat stress environment of…

 

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Western cotton (Acala, Upland, and Pima) germplasm enhancement for agronomic, fiber traits, and pest resistance

 

Summary:

Since the re-establishment of the USDA-ARS, WICS, genetic/breeding program, we have been focusing on bringing germplasm from any possible source available to us in order to increase genetic diversity. Most of the time, the genetic diversity in the cotton crop is used as an indicator to recognize potential threats to sustaining high yields. In the last couple of years, several troubling developments have recognized Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasirifectum (FOV) Atk. Sny & Hans as a recurring and potentially expanding threat to cotton production. The vulnerability of cotton production to this pathogen highlights the need for comprehensive research to protect the cotton industry from FOV, both from virulent populations which may be introduced and new virulent strains arising from within cotton production areas. Until recently, only race 1 and race 2 were known to occur in the United States (DeVay, 1986; Smith et al., 1981). UC scientists have recently identified race 4 ofFOV in cotton plants…

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Management of Key Cotton Arthropod Pests with Insecticides and Acaricides

INTRODUCTION

Integrated pest management of California cotton insect and mite pests is based on a long record of successful research and implementation. Maintaining cost-effective and efficacious insecticides and miticides is a constant, evolving process. As the pest biology, cropping patterns, cotton varieties, production techniques, and other factors change in the cotton agroecosystem, pest management needs change. The development of resistance in pests and regulatory actions are two of the key actions that influence the availability of crop protection tools. Fortunately, new materials are developed to facilitate control and to compensate for these losses. Regulatory actions with pesticides are ongoing and appear inevitable in California. Most recently, volatile organic compound (VOCs) issues have surfaced and regulations to restrict many…

 

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